Say “Hello, Again” to the Lincoln Motor Company

by Linsay Philippe-Auguste

Remix a play. Show a sonnet how to dance. Help a lost film find a new voice. Give a one-hit wonder a second chance. Make vintage vogue. These are some of the affirmations that make up the manifesto for the “Hello, Again” campaign created by The Lincoln Motor Company in 2013.

Lincoln is known for being an icon of luxury design in the American automobile industry. The brand has a bit of an antiquated feel, given its vintage allure and long history (going over 90 years). With such an image, how could the Lincoln brand appeal to the new generation of consumers?

Storytelling | Poetry in Motion

Enter the genius behind the “Hello, Again” campaign. Proud of its rich legacy, the Lincoln Motor Company decided to celebrate its past, to use it as a springboard to innovate and create new designs for the 21st century.

The campaign is storytelling at its best. The 3-minute brand film and 60-second TV ad unfold as artful interpretations of the company’s continuing influence in the automobile industry. The videos are composed of motion graphics and images of Lincoln cars, past and present:

  • The Zephyr
  • The Continental
  • The Sunshine Special
  • The Navigator
  • The MKZ

Every automobile tells a story. There’s a powerful sentiment attached to every model, to the way it was crafted and engineered.

The content also shows clever quotes from influential figures (such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Pierre Cartier and Edsel Ford) written in elegant typography, reflecting the aesthetic of Lincoln’s timeless designs.

The social media posts on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook embody the 4 Cs of writing strong digital content: the copy is clear, concise, compelling and correct. The creative visuals entice the senses whereas the historical elements engage the left side of the brain. Packaged beautifully, the campaign gives new life to the brand.

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Inspiration | Imagination | Innovation

“…We all have a magnificent story and magnificent knowledge. I think we just need to figure out ways to package it more effectively so that others will want to hear it and that we’ll be passionate to share it.” –John O’Leary

In his latest podcast on The Portfolio Life: Stop Running Away From Your Story, blogger Jeff Goins interviews John O’Leary, author of On Fire: The 7 Choices to Ignite a Radically Inspired Life. During a near-fatal explosion at age 9, John suffered third-degree burns on 87% of his body. After surviving multiple rounds of surgeries, including the amputation of his fingers, he longed to be “normal”, to fit in. It was, ultimately, the unhealthy decision to fit in, which caused him to hide for 30 years from his scars and from the beauty of his personal story.

With hindsight, the author realizes that by undermining his past, he almost missed out on a unique opportunity to be inspired by his own journey and to inspire others. Taking a second look at his story of survival allowed him to witness the strengths of his past.

screen-shot-2016-12-01-at-11-49-12

In the same fashion, “Hello, Again” allows The Lincoln Motor Company to give its past a fresh look and to take in all its accomplishments. The brand’s story feeds the audience’s thirst for imagination and innovation. It’s an invitation to embrace boldness and to step away from the “norm”.

“Rules were broken; risks were taken. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it didn’t, but it was always a step in the right direction. This year, we’ve said “Hello, Again” to the power of design, the way art is made, and given a forgotten song some new life.” (Hello, Again: The Last 90 Years)

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